Handbuch:PPC64/Installation/Festplatten

From Gentoo Wiki
Jump to:navigation Jump to:search
This page is a translated version of the page Handbook:PPC64/Installation/Disks and the translation is 100% complete.
PPC64 Handbuch
Installation
Über die Installation
Auswahl des Mediums
Konfiguration des Netzwerks
Vorbereiten der Festplatte(n)
Installation des Stage Archivs
Installation des Basissystems
Konfiguration des Kernels
Konfiguration des Systems
Installation der Tools
Konfiguration des Bootloaders
Abschluss
Arbeiten mit Gentoo
Portage-Einführung
USE-Flags
Portage-Features
Initskript-System
Umgebungsvariablen
Arbeiten mit Portage
Dateien und Verzeichnisse
Variablen
Mischen von Softwarezweigen
Zusätzliche Tools
Eigener Portage-Tree
Erweiterte Portage-Features
Netzwerk-Konfiguration
Zu Beginn
Fortgeschrittene Konfiguration
Modulare Vernetzung
Drahtlose Netzwerke
Funktionalität hinzufügen
Dynamisches Management


Einführung in blockorientierte Geräte

Blockorientierte Geräte

Schauen wir uns die Festplatten-spezifischen Aspekte von Gentoo Linux und Linux im Allgemeinen an - insbesondere blockorientierte Geräte (Block Devices), Partitionen und Linux Dateisysteme. Wenn Sie die Vor- und Nachteile von Festplatten verstanden haben, können Sie Partitionen und Dateisysteme für die Installation erstellen.

Zu Beginn schauen wir uns blockorientierte Geräte an. SCSI- und SATA-Laufwerke haben Device-Namen wie: /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc usw. Modernere Rechner können PCI-Express basierte NVMe Solid-State-Disks haben, die Device-Namen haben wie: /dev/nvme0n1, /dev/nvme0n2 usw.

Die folgende Tabelle soll Lesern dabei helfen herauszufinden, wo bestimmte Arten von blockorientierten Geräten zu finden sind:

Device-Typ Standard Device-Name Anmerkungen
IDE, SATA, SAS, SCSI, or USB flash /dev/sda Diese Device-Typen werden auf Hardware ab 2007 verwendet - und sind vermutlich die am häufigsten genutzten Device-Namen unter Linux. Diese Geräte werden als blockorientierter Speicher angeschlossen über den SATA bus, über SCSI und über USB. Beispielsweise wird die erste Partition des ersten SATA-Devices /dev/sda1 genannt.
NVM Express (NVMe) /dev/nvme0n1 The latest in solid state technology, NVMe drives are connected to the PCI Express bus and have the fastest transfer block speeds on the market. Systems from around 2014 and newer may have support for NVMe hardware. The first partition on the first NVMe device is called /dev/nvme0n1p1.
MMC, eMMC, and SD /dev/mmcblk0 embedded MMC devices, SD cards, and other types of memory cards can be useful for data storage. That said, many systems may not permit booting from these types of devices. It is suggested to not use these devices for active Linux installations; rather consider using them to transfer files, which is their design goal. Alternatively they could be useful for short-term backups.

Die oben genannten blockorientierten Geräte repräsentieren eine abstrakte Schnittstelle zur Festplatte. Benutzerprogramme können diese Block Devices nutzen, um mit der Festplatte zu interagieren, ohne sich darum sorgen zu müssen, ob die Festplatten über SATA, SCSI oder etwas anderem angebunden sind. Das Programm kann den Speicher auf der Festplatte einfach als eine Anhäufung zusammenhängender 4096-Byte (4k) Blöcke mit wahlfreiem Zugriff ansprechen.


Partitions and slices

Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house a Linux system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices are split up in smaller, more manageable block devices. On most systems, these are called partitions. Other architectures use a similar technique, called slices.

Designing a partition scheme

How many partitions and how big?

The design of disk partition layout is highly dependent on the demands of the system and the file system(s) applied to the device. If there are lots of users, then it is advised to have /home on a separate partition which will increase security and make backups and other types of maintenance easier. If Gentoo is being installed to perform as a mail server, then /var should be a separate partition as all mails are stored inside the /var directory. Game servers may have a separate /opt partition since most gaming server software is installed therein. The reason for these recommendations is similar to the /home directory: security, backups, and maintenance.

In most situations on Gentoo, /usr and /var should be kept relatively large in size. /usr hosts the majority of applications available on the system and the Linux kernel sources (under /usr/src). By default, /var hosts the Gentoo ebuild repository (located at /var/db/repos/gentoo) which, depending on the file system, generally consumes around 650 MiB of disk space. This space estimate excludes the /var/cache/distfiles and /var/cache/binpkgs directories, which will gradually fill with source files and (optionally) binary packages respectively as they are added to the system.

How many partitions and how big very much depends on considering the trade-offs and choosing the best option for the circumstance. Separate partitions or volumes have the following advantages:

  • Choose the best performing filesystem for each partition or volume.
  • The entire system cannot run out of free space if one defunct tool is continuously writing files to a partition or volume.
  • If necessary, file system checks are reduced in time, as multiple checks can be done in parallel (although this advantage is realized more with multiple disks than it is with multiple partitions).
  • Security can be enhanced by mounting some partitions or volumes read-only, nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored), etc.


However, multiple partitions have certain disadvantages as well:

  • If not configured properly, the system might have lots of free space on one partition and little free space on another.
  • A separate partition for /usr/ may require the administrator to boot with an initramfs to mount the partition before other boot scripts start. Since the generation and maintenance of an initramfs is beyond the scope of this handbook, we recommend that newcomers do not use a separate partition for /usr/.
  • There is also a 15-partition limit for SCSI and SATA unless the disk uses GPT labels.
Hinweis
Installations that intend to use systemd as the service and init system must have the /usr directory available at boot, either as part of the root filesystem or mounted via an initramfs.

What about swap space?

Recommendations for swap space size
RAM size Suspend support? Hibernation support?
2 GB or less 2 * RAM 3 * RAM
2 to 8 GB RAM amount 2 * RAM
8 to 64 GB 8 GB minimum, 16 maximum 1.5 * RAM
64 GB or greater 8 GB minimum Hibernation not recommended! Hibernation is not recommended for systems with very large amounts of memory. While possible, the entire contents of memory must be written to disk in order to successfully hibernate. Writing tens of gigabytes (or worse!) out to disk can can take a considerable amount of time, especially when rotational disks are used. It is best to suspend in this scenario.

There is no perfect value for swap space size. The purpose of the space is to provide disk storage to the kernel when internal dynamic memory (RAM) is under pressure. A swap space allows for the kernel to move memory pages that are not likely to be accessed soon to disk (swap or page-out), which will free memory in RAM for the current task. Of course, if the pages swapped to disk are suddenly needed, they will need to be put back in memory (page-in) which will take considerably longer than reading from RAM (as disks are very slow compared to internal memory).

When a system is not going to run memory intensive applications or has lots of RAM available, then it probably does not need much swap space. However do note in case of hibernation that swap space is used to store the entire contents of memory (likely on desktop and laptop systems rather than on server systems). If the system requires support for hibernation, then swap space larger than or equal to the amount of memory is necessary.

As a general rule for RAM amounts less than 4 GB, the swap space size is recommended to be twice the internal memory (RAM). For systems with multiple hard disks, it is wise to create one swap partition on each disk so that they can be utilized for parallel read/write operations. The faster a disk can swap, the faster the system will run when data in swap space must be accessed. When choosing between rotational and solid state disks, it is better for performance to put swap on the solid state hardware.

It is worth noting that swap files can be used as an alternative to swap partitions; this is mostly helpful for systems with very limited disk space.

Default: Using mac-fdisk

Wichtig
These instructions are for the Apple G5 system.
Partition Description
/dev/sda1 Apple partition map, automatically created when the disk is formatted with a "mac" partition table.
/dev/sda2 New World boot block
/dev/sda3 Swap partition
/dev/sda4 Root partition

Start mac-fdisk:

root #mac-fdisk /dev/sda

First delete the partitions that have been cleared previously to make room for Linux partitions. Use the d key in mac-fdisk to delete those partition(s). It will ask for the partition number to delete.

Second, create an Apple_Bootstrap partition by pressing the b key. It will ask for a block from which to start. Enter the number of the first free partition, followed by entering a p. For instance this is 2p.

Hinweis
This partition is not a "boot" partition. It is not used by Linux at all; there is no need to place any filesystem on it and it should never be mounted. PPC users do not need an extra partition for /boot.

Now create a swap partition by pressing the c key. Again mac-fdisk will ask what block to start from. As we used 2 before to create the Apple_Bootstrap partition, enter 3p. When asked for the size, enter 512M (or whatever size needed). When asked for a name, enter swap (mandatory).

To create the root partition, enter c, followed by 4p to select from what block the root partition should start. When asked for the size, enter 4p again. mac-fdisk will interpret this as "Use all available space". When asked for the name, enter root (mandatory).

To finish up, write the partition to the disk using w and q to quit mac-fdisk.

Hinweis
To make sure everything is okay, run mac-fdisk once more to verify all the partitions are present. If a partition is absent, or it is missing some of the changes that were made, then reinitialize the partitions by pressing i in mac-fdisk. Note that this will recreate the partition map and thus remove all the partitions.

Alternative: Using fdisk

Wichtig
The following instructions are for IBM pSeries, iSeries, and OpenPower systems.
Hinweis
When planning to use a RAID disk array for the Gentoo installation on POWER5-based hardware, first run iprconfig to format the disks to Advanced Function format and create the disk array. Emerge sys-fs/iprutils after the installation is complete.

If the system has an ipr-based SCSI adapter, start the ipr utilities now.

root #/etc/init.d/iprinit start

The following parts explain how to create the example partition layout described previously, namely:

Partition Description
/dev/sda1 PPC PReP Boot partition
/dev/sda2 Swap partition
/dev/sda3 Root partition

Change or modify the partition layout according to personal preference.

Viewing current partition layout

fdisk is a popular and powerful tool to split a disk into partitions. Fire up fdisk on the current disk (in our example, we use /dev/sda):

root #fdisk /dev/sda
Command (m for help)

If there is still an AIX partition layout on the system, then the following error message will be displayed:

root #fdisk /dev/sda
  There is a valid AIX label on this disk.
  Unfortunately Linux cannot handle these
  disks at the moment.  Nevertheless some
  advice:
  1. fdisk will destroy its contents on write.
  2. Be sure that this disk is NOT a still vital
     part of a volume group. (Otherwise you may
     erase the other disks as well, if unmirrored.)
  3. Before deleting this physical volume be sure
     to remove the disk logically from your AIX
     machine.  (Otherwise you become an AIXpert).

Don't worry, new empty DOS partition table can be created by pressing o.

Warnung
This will destroy any installed AIX version!

Type p to display the disk current partition configuration:

Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1          12       53266+  83  Linux
/dev/sda2              13         233      981571+  82  Linux swap
/dev/sda3             234         674     1958701+  83  Linux
/dev/sda4             675        6761    27035410+   5  Extended
/dev/sda5             675        2874     9771268+  83  Linux
/dev/sda6            2875        2919      199836   83  Linux
/dev/sda7            2920        3008      395262   83  Linux
/dev/sda8            3009        6761    16668918   83  Linux

This particular disk is configured to house six Linux filesystems (each with a corresponding partition listed as "Linux") as well as a swap partition (listed as "Linux swap").

Removing all partitions

First remove all existing partitions from the disk. Type d to delete a partition. For instance, to delete an existing /dev/sda1:

Command (m for help):d
Partition number (1-4): 1

The partition has been scheduled for deletion. It will no longer show up when typing p, but it will not be erased until the changes have been saved. If a mistake was made and the session needs to be aborted, then type q immediately and hit Enter and none of the partitions will be deleted or modified.

Now, assuming that indeed all partitions need to be wiped out, repeatedly type p to print out a partition listing and then type d and the number of the partition to delete it. Eventually, the partition table will show no more partitions:

Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
Device Boot    Start       End    Blocks   Id  System

Now that the in-memory partition table is empty, let's create the partitions. We will use a default partitioning scheme as discussed previously. Of course, don't follow these instructions to the letter but adjust to personal preference.

Creating the PPC PReP boot partition

First create a small PReP boot partition. Type n to create a new partition, then p to select a primary partition, followed by 1 to select the first primary partition. When prompted for the first cylinder, hit Enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, type +7M to create a partition 7 MB in size. After this, type t to set the partition type, 1 to select the partition just created and then type in 41 to set the partition type to "PPC PReP Boot". Finally, mark the PReP partition as bootable.

Hinweis
The PReP partition has to be smaller than 8 MB!
Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
Command (m for help):n
Command action
      e   extended
      p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 1
First cylinder (1-6761, default 1): 
Using default value 1
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-6761, default
6761): +8M
Command (m for help):t
Selected partition 1
Hex code (type L to list codes): 41
Changed system type of partition 1 to 41 (PPC PReP Boot)
Command (m for help):a
Partition number (1-4): 1
Command (m for help):

Now, when looking at the partition table again (through p), the following partition information should be shown:

Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1  *            1           3       13293   41  PPC PReP Boot

Creating the swap partition

Now create the swap partition. To do this, type n to create a new partition, then p to tell fdisk to create a primary partition. Then type 2 to create the second primary partition, /dev/sda2 in our case. When prompted for the first cylinder, hit Enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, type +512M to create a partition 512MB in size. After this, type t to set the partition type, 2 to select the partition just created and then type in 82 to set the partition type to "Linux Swap". After completing these steps, typing p should display a partition table that looks similar to this:

Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1           3       13293   41  PPC PReP Boot
/dev/sda2               4         117      506331   82  Linux swap

Creating the root partition

Finally, create the root partition. To do this, type n to create a new partition, then p to tell fdisk to create a primary partition. Then type 3 to create the third primary partition, /dev/sda3 in our case. When prompted for the first cylinder, hit Enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, hit enter to create a partition that takes up the rest of the remaining space on the disk. After completing these steps, typing p should display a partition table that looks similar to this:

Command (m for help):p
Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
  
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1           3       13293   41  PPC PReP Boot
/dev/sda2               4         117      506331   82  Linux swap
/dev/sda3             118        6761    29509326   83  Linux

Saving the partition layout

To save the partition layout and exit fdisk, type w.

Command (m for help):w


Erstellen von Dateisystemen

Warnung
Wenn Sie ein SSD- oder NVMe-Laufwerk verwenden, prüfen Sie bitte, ob es ein Firmware-Upgrade benötigt. Insbesondere einige Intel-SSDs (600p und 6000p) benötigen ein Firmware-Upgrade für kritische Fehlerbehebungen, um Datenbeschädigungen zu vermeiden, die durch XFS-I/O-Nutzungsmuster verursacht werden (allerdings nicht durch einen Fehler des Dateisystems). smartctl kann helfen, das Modell und die Firmware-Version zu überprüfen.

Einleitung

Nachdem die Partitionen angelegt wurden, ist es an der Zeit, Dateisysteme darauf anzulegen. Im nächsten Abschnitt werden die unterschiedlichen Dateisysteme beschrieben, die Linux unterstützt. Leser, die bereits wissen, welches Dateisystem sie verwenden wollen, können bei Dateisystem auf einer Partition anlegen fortfahren. Alle anderen sollten weiterlesen, um mehr über die verfügbaren Dateisysteme zu erfahren ...

Dateisysteme

Linux unterstützt mehrere Dutzend Dateisysteme, wobei allerdings viele davon für ganz spezielle Anwendungszwecke optimiert sind. Nur einige Dateisysteme gelten als stabil auf der ppc64 Architektur. Es ist ratsam, sich über Dateisysteme und deren Unterstützungsgrad zu informieren, damit Sie nicht für wichtige Partitionen ein eher experimentelles Dateisystem wählen. XFS ist das empfohlene all-round Dateisystem für alle Plattformen. Nachfolgend eine nicht-vollständige Auswahl von verfügbaren Dateisystemen.

btrfs
Dateisystem der neueren Generation.

Bietet erweiterte Funktionen wie Snapshotting, Selbstheilung durch Prüfsummen, transparente Kompression, Subvolumes und integriertes RAID. Kernel vor 5.4.y sind nicht garantiert sicher für die Verwendung mit btrfs in der Produktion, da Korrekturen für ernsthafte Probleme nur in den neueren Versionen der LTS-Kernelzweige vorhanden sind. RAID 5/6 und Quota-Gruppen sind bei allen Versionen von btrfs unsicher.

ext4
Ext4 ist ein zuverlässiges, universell einsetztbares Dateisystem für alle Plattformen, auch wenn ihm moderne Funktionen wie Reflinks fehlen.
f2fs
Das Flash-Friendly File System wurde ursprünglich von Samsung für die Verwendung mit NAND-Flash-Speicher entwickelt. Es ist eine gute Wahl für die Installation von Gentoo auf microSD-Karten, USB-Laufwerken oder anderen Flash-basierten Speichergeräten.
XFS
Dateisystem mit Metadaten-Journaling, das über einen robusten Funktionsumfang verfügt und für Skalierbarkeit optimiert ist. Es wurde kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt, um moderne Funktionen einzubeziehen. Der einzige Nachteil ist, dass XFS-Partitionen noch nicht verkleinert werden können, obwohl daran gearbeitet wird. XFS unterstützt vor allem Reflinks und Copy on Write (CoW), was besonders auf Gentoo-Systemenen hilfreich ist, da die Benutzer viele Kompilierungen durchführen müssen. XFS ist das empfohlene modernen Allzweck-Dateisystem für alle Plattformen. Erfordert, dass eine Partition mindestens 300 MB groß ist.
VFAT
Auch bekannt als FAT32, wird von Linux unterstützt, unterstützt aber nicht die Standard-UNIX-Berechtigungseinstellungen. Es wird hauptsächlich für die Interoperabilität/den Austausch mit anderen Betriebssystemen (Microsoft Windows oder Apples MacOS) verwendet, ist aber auch eine Notwendigkeit für einige System-Bootloader-Firmware (wie UEFI). Benutzer von UEFI-Systemen benötigen eine EFI System Partition, die mit VFAT formatiert ist, um booten zu können.
NTFS
Dieses 'New Technology"-Dateisystem ist das Vorzeige-Dateisystem von Microsoft Windows seit Windows NT 3.1. Ähnlich wie VFAT speichert es keine UNIX-Berechtigungseinstellungen oder erweiterte Attribute, die für BSD oder Linux notwendig sind, um ordnungsgemäß zu funktionieren, daher sollte es in den meisten Fällen nicht als Root-Dateisystem verwendet werden. Es sollte nur für die Interoperabilität oder den Datenaustausch mit Microsoft Windows-Systemen verwendet werden (beachten Sie die Betonung auf nur).

Ausführlichere Informationen über Dateisysteme finden Sie in dem von der Community gepflegten Dateisystem-Artikel.

Dateisystem auf einer Partition anlegen

Hinweis
Bitte stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie das entsprechende Paket für das gewählte Dateisystem später im Handbuch emergen, bevor Sie am Ende des Installationsprozesses neu booten.

Dateisysteme können mit Hilfe von Programmen auf einer Partition oder auf einem Datenträger angelegt werden. Die folgende Tabelle zeigt, welchen Befehl Sie für welches Dateisystem benötigen. Um weitere Informationen zu einem Dateisystem zu erhalten, können Sie auf den Namen des Dateisystems klicken.

Dateisystem Befehl zum Anlegen Teil der Minimal CD? Gentoo Paket
btrfs mkfs.btrfs Yes sys-fs/btrfs-progs
ext4 mkfs.ext4 Yes sys-fs/e2fsprogs
f2fs mkfs.f2fs Yes sys-fs/f2fs-tools
xfs mkfs.xfs Yes sys-fs/xfsprogs
vfat mkfs.vfat Yes sys-fs/dosfstools
NTFS mkfs.ntfs Yes sys-fs/ntfs3g
Wichtig
The handbook recommends new partitions as part of the installation process, but it is important to note running any mkfs command will erase any data contained within the partition. When necessary, ensure any data that exists within is appropriately backed up before creating a few filesystem.

Um beispielsweise die EFI System-Partition (/dev/sda1) als FAT32 und die root-Partition (/dev/sda3) als xfs zu formatieren (wie in dem Beispiel-Partitionsschema), würde man folgende Befehle verwenden:

root #mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3

EFI system partition filesystem

The EFI system partition (/dev/sda1) must be formatted as FAT32:

root #mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1

Legacy BIOS boot partition filesystem

Systems booting via legacy BIOS with a MBR/DOS disklabel can use any filesystem format supported by the bootloader.

For example, to format with XFS:

root #mkfs.xfs /dev/sda1

Small ext4 partitions

Bei der Verwendung von ext4 auf kleinen Partitionen (kleiner als 8 GiB), sollte das Dateisystem mit den passenden Optionen erstellt werden, um genügend Inodes zu reservieren. Dies kann mit einer der folgenden Anweisungen erfolgen:

root #mkfs.ext4 -T small /dev/<device>

Dies vervierfacht die Zahl der Inodes für ein angegebenes Dateisystem in der Regel, da es dessen "bytes-per-inode" (Bytes pro Inode) von 16 kB auf 4 kB pro Inode reduziert.

Aktivieren der Swap-Partition

mkswap ist der Befehl der verwendet wird um Swap-Partitionen zu initialisieren:

root #mkswap /dev/sda2

Zur Aktivierung der Swap-Partition verwenden Sie swapon:

root #swapon /dev/sda2

This 'activation' step is only necessary because the swap partition is newly created within the live environment. Once the system has been rebooted, as long as the swap partition is properly defined within fstab or other mount mechanism, swap space will activate automatically.

Einhängen der Root-Partition

Hinweis
Installations which were previously started, but did not finish the installation process can resume the installation from this point in the handbook. Use this link as the permalink: Resumed installations start here.
Tipp
Anwender, die ein Nicht-Gentoo Installationsmedium verwenden, müssen mit folgendem Befehl einen Mount-Point erzeugen:
root #mkdir --parents /mnt/gentoo
root #mkdir --parents

For EFI installs only, the ESP should be mounted under the root partition location:

root #mkdir --parents

Continue creating additional mount points necessary for any additional (custom) partition(s) created during previous steps by using the mkdir command.

Nachdem die Partitionen initialisiert wurden und ein Dateisystem beinhalten, ist es an der Zeit, diese einzuhängen. Verwenden Sie den Befehl mount, aber vergessen Sie nicht die notwendigen Einhänge-Verzeichnisse für jede Partition zu erzeugen. Als Beispiel hängen wir die Root-Partition ein:

Mount the root partition:

root #mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/gentoo

Continue mounting additional (custom) partitions as necessary using the mount command.

Hinweis
Wenn sich /tmp/ auf einer separaten Partition befinden muss, ändern Sie die Berechtigungen nach dem Einhängen:
root #chmod 1777 /mnt/gentoo/tmp
Dies gilt ebenfalls für /var/tmp.

In der Anleitung wird später das Dateisystem proc (eine virtuelle Schnittstelle zum Kernel) zusammen mit anderen Kernel Pseudo-Dateisystemen eingehängt. Zunächst installieren wir jedoch die Gentoo Installationsdateien.