BIND/Guide

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This guide teaches the reader how install and configure BIND for a domain and a local network.

Introduction

This tutorial will show you how to install and configure BIND, the most used DNS server on Internet. We will configure BIND for a domain using different configurations, one for a local network and one for the rest of the world. Two views will be used to do so:

  1. View of the internal zone (your local network).
  2. View for the external zone (rest of the world).

Data used in the examples

Keyword Explanation Example
YOUR_DOMAIN Your domain name gentoo.org
YOUR_PUBLIC_IP The public ip that ISP gives to you 204.74.99.100
YOUR_LOCAL_IP The local ip address 192.168.1.5
YOUR_LOCAL_NETWORK The local network 192.168.1.0/24
SLAVE_DNS_SERVER The ip address of the slave DNS server for your domain. 209.177.148.228
ADMIN The DNS server administrator's name. root
MODIFICATION The modification date of the file zone, with a number added 2009062901

Configuring BIND

Installation

First, install net-dns/bind.

root #emerge --ask net-dns/bind

Configuring /etc/bind/named.conf

The first thing to configure is /etc/bind/named.conf. The first part of this step is specifying bind's root directory, the listening port with the IPs, the pid file, and a line for IPv6 protocol.

FILE /etc/bind/named.confoptions section
options {
        directory "/var/bind";
  
        listen-on-v6 { none; };
        listen-on port 53 { 127.0.0.1; YOUR_LOCAL_IP; };
  
        pid-file "/var/run/named/named.pid";
};

The second part of named.conf is the internal view used for our local network.

FILE /etc/bind/named.confInternal view
view "internal" {
        match-clients { YOUR_LOCAL_NETWORK; localhost; };
        recursion yes;
  
        zone "YOUR_DOMAIN" {
                type master;
                file "pri/YOUR_DOMAIN.internal";
                allow-transfer { any; };
        };
};

The third part of named.conf is the external view used to resolve our domain name for the rest of the world and to resolve all other domain names for us (and anyone who wants to use our DNS server).

FILE /etc/bind/named.confExternal view
view "external" {
        match-clients { any; };
        recursion no;
  
        zone "." IN {
                type hint;
                file "named.ca";
        };
  
        zone "127.in-addr.arpa" IN {
                type master;
                file "pri/127.zone";
                allow-update { none; };
                notify no;
        };
  
        zone "YOUR_DOMAIN" {
                type master;
                file "pri/YOUR_DOMAIN.external";
                allow-query { any; };
                allow-transfer { SLAVE_DNS_SERVER; };
        };
};

The final part of named.conf is the logging policy.

FILE /etc/bind/named.confExternal view
logging {
        channel default_syslog {
                file "/var/log/named/named.log" versions 3 size 5m;
                severity debug;
                print-time yes;
                print-severity yes;
                print-category yes;
        };
       category default { default_syslog; };
};

The /var/log/named/ directory must be exist and belong to named:

root #mkdir -p /var/log/named/
root #chmod 770 /var/log/named/
root #touch /var/log/named/named.log
root #chmod 660 /var/log/named/named.log
root #chown -R named /var/log/named/
root #chgrp -R named /var/log/named/

Creating the internal zone file

We use the hostnames and IP addresses of the picture network example. Note that almost all (not all) domain names finish with "." (dot).

FILE /var/bind/pri/YOUR_DOMAIN.internal
$TTL 2d
@	IN SOA	ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.	ADMIN.YOUR_DOMAIN. (
	MODIFICATION	; serial
	3h	; refresh
	1h	; retry
	1w	; expiry
	1d )	; minimum
  
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN MX	0 mail.YOUR_DOMAIN.
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN TXT	"v=spf1 ip4:YOUR_PUBLIC_IP/32 mx ptr mx:mail.YOUR_DOMAIN ~all"
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN NS	ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN NS	SLAVE_DNS_SERVER
www.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.3
ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN A	192.168.1.5
mail.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.3
router.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.1
hell.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.3
heaven.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.5
desktop.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	192.168.1.4

Creating the external zone file

Here we only have the subdomains we want for external clients (www, mail, and ns).

FILE /var/bind/pri/YOUR_DOMAIN.external
$TTL 2d
@	IN SOA	ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.	ADMIN.YOUR_DOMAIN. (
	MODIFICATION	;serial
	3h	;refresh
	1h	;retry
	1w	;expiry
	1d )	;minimum
  
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN MX	0 mail.YOUR_DOMAIN.
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN TXT	"v=spf1 ip4:YOUR_PUBLIC_IP/32 mx ptr mx:mail.YOUR_DOMAIN ~all"
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN NS	ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.
YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN NS	SLAVE_DNS_SERVER
www.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	YOUR_PUBLIC_IP
ns.YOUR_DOMAIN.		IN A	YOUR_PUBLIC_IP
mail.YOUR_DOMAIN.	IN A	YOUR_PUBLIC_IP

Finishing configuration

You'll need to add named to the default runlevel:

root #rc-update add named default

Configuring clients

Now you can use your own DNS server in all machines of your local network to resolve domain names. Modify the /etc/resolv.conf file of all machines of your local network.

FILE /etc/resolv.conf
search YOUR_DOMAIN
nameserver YOUR_DNS_SERVER_IP

Note that YOUR_DNS_SERVER_IP is the same as YOUR_LOCAL_IP we used in this document. In the picture the example is 192.168.1.5.

Testing

We are able to test our new DNS server. First, we need to start the service.

root #/etc/init.d/named start

Now, we are going to make some host commands to some domains. We can use any computer of our local network to do this test. If you don't have net-dns/host installed you can use ping instead. Otherwise, first run emerge host .

user $host www.gentoo.org
www.gentoo.org has address 209.177.148.228
www.gentoo.org has address 209.177.148.229
user $host hell
hell.YOUR_DOMAIN has address 192.168.1.3
user $host router
router.YOUR_DOMAIN has address 192.168.1.1

Protecting the server with iptables

When running the DNS service, iptables can be configured with these rules for added protection:

CODE Iptables rules
iptables -A INPUT -p udp --sport 53 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p udp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT

This page is based on a document formerly found on our main website gentoo.org.
The following people contributed to the original document: Vicente Olivert Riera, nightmorph
They are listed here because wiki history does not allow for any external attribution. If you edit the wiki article, please do not add yourself here; your contributions are recorded on each article's associated history page.